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20100901
20100930
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KQED (PBS) 14
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English 14
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
a third happened here. we joined british and u.s. marines as they prepared for one of their last joint patrols. for a final few days, they must brave their demons and reflect on the sacrifices that have been made. commanders were keen to show us what they achieved, all the project have -- how the province has prospered and how much safer and has become, but this is what we saw. [gunshots fired] a brutal fight for much of the day. it does not happen much anymore, but it shows the taliban battling coalition troops. and now america must finish the job britain started. no british troops at this time, they have faced too many days like this. >> i find it very difficult to talk about. without someone having been there, you cannot describe the smells, the sites, even pictures don't seem to work. you have to be there and, the emotions -- to have a true understanding of what people here go through. >> handing over to the americans is a bittersweet mellon for the troops. there happen -- they are happy to be going, but their regret the mission is far from over. >> the amount of effort, time, live
parliamentary elections. some of the political players may decide to use violence themselves as a pressure point. >> lehrer: newshour correspondent spencer michels examines the impact of u.s. supreme court rulings on local gun regulations in california. >> among the first results of the supreme court decisions on guns: gun shows like this may become more common in california. >> woodruff: plus an encore look at jeffrey brown's profile of tap dance great maurice hines passing the torch and tradition to a new generation. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: the east coast kept a weather eye on the sea today, waiting for the arrival of hurricane earl. the storm weakened some during the day, but still had winds of 115 miles an hour. in kill devil hills, north carolina, the day dawned on a relativel
sergeant olaf schmidt. >> almost a third happened here. in sangin. we join british and u.s. marines as they prepared for one of their last joint patrols. for a final few days, they must brave their demons and reflect on the sacrifices that have been made. commanders were keen to show was they've achieved, how the area has proffered prospered, how much safer it's become. but this is what we saw. a long and brutal fight throughout much of the day. it doesn't happen all the time anymore, but it shows the taliban still battling coalition troops. and now america must try to finish the job britain started. no british troops were injured this time but they faced too many days like this. >> i find it very difficult to talk about actually having someone have been there, you can't describe the smells, the sights, there's no way to describe all this, even pictures don't seem to work. you have to actually be there and go through the emotions to have a true understanding of what the people here go,000. >> handing over to the americans is a bittersweet moment for the troops. they're happy to be g
on the people, especially the children. >> they're getting to the heart of the matter. u.s. middle east envoy george mitchell's assessment of the talks between israelis and palestinians. a senior vatican official describes the uk as a third world country. he has pulled out of the pope's statement. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america, also run the globe. coming up later, outside, the streets ring with protests. inside, france's lower house passes the bill which will raise the retirement age from 60 to 62, and serving therapy. can riding a wave help you call for mental health problems? public service is putting in health care money to find out. hello to you. millions -- yes, millions -- of people are going hungry at this moment across central and western africa. the worst affected country is niger, a country even larger than the united states of california and texas together, but with a population of just 15 million. the drought's amid flooding of ruined crops. help has not been enough. we go to niger for this special report. >> according to the united nations, in development terms, niger
joined us. a conversation with tim robbins is coming up right now. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance proudly supports tavis smiley. tavis and nationwide insurance, working to improve financial literacy and the economic empowerment that comes with it. >> ♪ nationwide is on your side ♪ >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: please welcome tim robbins back to this program. the actor and director also serves as writer for a play called "break the whip" about jamestown. here is now a scene from "break the whip." [drums beating] ♪ tavis: when you called me and asked me to come down to rehearsal to check this out. -- to check this out, i had no idea what i was going to see. imagine a piece about jamestown that does not mention pocahontas or -- >> or john smith. tavis: i was talking to our producer. i was curious how many times you have
reporter in washington for as -- bob woodward is still making waves. >> our reporter in washington for us. let's go to new york with our correspondent. barbara, even in a time of austerity, the u.s. has to live up to its aid and given the responsibilities, but he seems to want nothing less than an entirely new responsibilities -- has to live up to its aid and other responsibilities, but he seems to want nothing less than new responsibilities. >> this is a much broader theme that it involves, trade policy and investment policy and things like that. instead of food aid, for instance, he might invest in the agricultural sector, and some have welcomed this more structural approach to trying to stop poverty, but it is said that president obama did not commit any new money to the millennium development goals, even though america is very bar behind -- far behind the goals it set tenures ago. >> barbara, -- the goals it set 10 years ago. >> barbara, what about this new role? >> i think what he is going to be tried to do is have a result -- he is going to be trying to have a new result. rather tha
%. give us the lowest corporation tax in the g-7. and that is a huge advert in this program, by the way, it is a good low corporate tax environment. >> rose: that's what ireland did exactly. >> and i think now they were able to take it quite a lot further than 24%. but nevertheless, from we're taking it from 28% to 24%. if you think of many people in my situation, many people sitting in a room like this, in faced with a very high budget deficit we would be very tempted to put up business taxes. but because, precisely because i want to give-- given growth and private sector investment and job creation, that i'm actually going in the other direction and reducing business taxes. >> rose: but the president is making in the united states the exact opposite decision. >> every country has got to make his own decisions. and the american administration has got challenges just like the british government has got. challenges. but actually, if you look at, from what i can gather, the u.s. administration is concerned about infrastructure. we've concerned about infrastructure. we're protecting the ca
and that's going to be enormously difficult. >> rose: in u.s. they are not just cutting fat they are cutting to the muscle. >> they are cutting it back in a big way. >> they have to do two things, make the case for paring back and cutting back in public spending without cuting the roots of future economic growth in this country. therefore, focus on your priorities. don't just take out sort of an axe across the whole waterfront of public spending and investment. make sure that as you make your savings, cut down your expenditure, make your economy, do not axe those things on which our future economic growth depend. >> this new government here will be doing some difficult things. and people will be reminded of the fact that the decision makers-- . >> rose: but are you in favor of them doing difficult things i understand. >> i am favor of them doing difficult things but i think it also alters the way you people look at domestic policy. >> rose: i poke to george osborne about these and other issues today in an interview earlier at his office here in london. >> here is that conver
facing the world. -- greatest threat facing the world. they would use chemical or nuclear weapons if they could. the chinese government ordered food producers to start growing more comfortable -- growing more vegetables. in mozambique, seven people died this week in protests about the 30% rise of the cost of bread. the un called for a special meeting to discuss the implications of a price spike. >> more wild fires fanned by strong winds and more houses destroyed and more loss of life after 50 people were killed in july and august. underlying it all is a prolonged drought. they destroyed 20% of russia's wheat crop. the government extended its ban on wheat exports to compensate. thousands of kilometers away in mozambique's plight is starting to return to normal. the trigger was a sharp rise in the cost of bread. the government insisted it had no choice but to raise prices. seven people were killed. nearly 300 were injured. this has left extensive damage. what is happening to food prices? is there a risk of a repeat of the food crisis of 2008? the world saul price climbed -- saw pric
. these reports come from one of the hardest hit areas. >> the families that used to live here have homes and a community, but it was all swept away. it is a sad indication of how desperate people are. every time there is a car they are hoping we are here to help. weeks after the disaster, most are dependent on handouts and have no means of helping themselves. >> at least someone got something by the government. that is why i can honestly tell you nobody has died of starting. >> it is not going as smoothly as the government says. there is not enough aid to go around. this descends into chaos. flood victims tired of waiting for food take matters into their own hands with dozens jumping onto the aid trucks. the decision is made to get the vehicle away from the rest of the crowd. a truck is driven down the highway filled with people still trying to cling on. some managed to get off some distance away. the incident illustrated dave plight of so many across this nation -- the pitiful plight. >> a military court of sri lanka convicted the former military chief of corruption. sarath fonseka was
what high cholesterol is or how many visits and says, "use good medical management," well, that's an open-ended and very debatable question. >> reporter: also debatable? how disruptive the new law will be. already, insurers including aetna, cigna and humana say they will stop selling plans that cover only children. since they can't limit pre- existing conditions, insurers worry parents will wait until after kids are sick to buy coverage. and this is only the beginning. most of the big changes don't kick in until 2012, including new purchasing pools and the requirement for everyone to have insurance. florida insurance commissioner kevin mccarty expects lots of changes between now and then. >> some companies are going to be deciding whether to stay in the market. we obviously like to see a conservative approach to keep as many people in the marketplace as possible. >> reporter: while there is a lot of uncertainty in the implementation of the health care law, there's also uncertainty about the law itself. florida is one of 20 states suing to block the health care law, and many repu
with japanese ships. good to have you with us. still to come, english cheese is taking on the french. we report and the growing global appetite for a taste of york sure. -- tasted york shire. first, three australian soldiers have been charged of the deaths of six people, five of them children, in afghanistan. it is alleged ds chileans attacked the wrong house while searching for a taliban leader. -- it is alleged the australians attacked the wrong house. >> the charges against the soldiers relate to a commando raid on suspected taliban hideout. six people, including five afghan children were killed in the operation in february, 2009. four others were wounded. a military prosecutor has now decided the three servicemen will be charged with various offenses. they include man charger -- manslaughter, dangerous conduct, and failing to obey an order. the prime minister says it will have every opportunity to clear their names. >> the accused persons will be offered support. in relation, i would say the following -- our australian defense force has strict rules of engagement and i think they of the fin
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)

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